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Thread: Watching Online

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canada View Post
    Thanks man, good to see you again

    Right as the game was being found by the bartender it looked like Griff had just run out of bounds to his left. Was that not a scramble and how did he look? We also couldn't figure out with the sound down why it wasn't a TD to Robinson, perfect throw.
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell Green Fan View Post
    Thanks man, good to see you again

    Right as the game was being found by the bartender it looked like Griff had just run out of bounds to his left. Was that not a scramble and how did he look? We also couldn't figure out with the sound down why it wasn't a TD to Robinson, perfect throw.
    Robinson put one of his hand out of bounds as he went to the ground.

    Griffin looked ok, played only one drive and they ran the ball most of the time.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

  3. #18
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    He got smacked on his first throw...Trent Williams let his guy push him upfield and then cut inside him once he saw he had a bee-line to RGIII. By my timing, though, the ball was out in 2.88 seconds. Might have just been a good play by New England #99. Griff looked comfortable, though, unlike the beginning of last year.

  4. #19
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    So 99 is Will Smith. I forgot he is now in NE.

    I just timed all the throws Griff made...the first one was the longest at nearly three seconds. The others were less than 2.5 each...in the first preseason game.

  5. #20
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    Five observations from Washington’s preseason opener, by Mike Jones

    The Washington Redskins’ 23-6 preseason opening victory over the New England Patriots went about as well as the team could have hoped.

    Okay, well maybe a touchdown to Aldrick Robinson on Washington’s first possession instead of a field goal, and a successful 46-yard attempt by Kai Forbath instead of a miss, and a shutout by the defense rather than a late-game touchdown pass by Jimmy Garoppolo would’ve counted as the best possible outcome. But as far as Preseason Week 1 outings go, this was a decent showing.

    Now, you have to take it with a grain of salt — or two. As Brian Orakpo will remind you, Washington went 4-0 last preseason, and that meant very little. Also, the Patriots played without eight starters, including Tom Brady and his top two receivers, Julian Edelman and Danny Amendola.

    But the Redskins – controlling what they could control – did what they should have done. They too were without key starters (Pierre Garcon, DeSean Jackson, Jason Hatcher and Ryan Clark), but they moved the ball on offense, and got stops on defense. Now they return to Richmond, where they’ll spend four more days and then break camp and continue their work in Ashburn.

    But first, here are some observations from last night’s game.

    1. Griffin’s start: Four pass attempts in 10 snaps don’t give you much to go on, but Robert Griffin III did some good things, and he also had one shaky play. On his first pass attempt of the night, Griffin showed an ability to quickly scan the field, diagnose the situation and go from Plan A to Plan C. Griffin took the snap, faked the handoff to Alfred Morris and wanted to go to Robinson deep. But he was covered. His second read – Ryan Grant down the middle – was covered as well. So Griffin wound up dumping the ball off to Logan Paulsen. Now, a couple of plays later, Griffin had a close call. His throw to Alfred Morris sailed wide and out of bounds. But it’s a good thing it did, because linebacker Darius Flemming would’ve had a shot at an interception as he tried to jump the route. Griffin almost had a touchdown pass to Robinson, but the receiver couldn’t come down with the ball in bounds. On such a small body of work, it’s hard to grade Griffin, though. He was serviceable, which is okay. Jay Gruden took a conservative approach and called six run plays to ease the quarterback in, which was probably smart. Next week we’ll probably see the workload increase slightly. But the coach felt good about what he saw. “Overall, he managed the game and got guys in and out of the huddle,” Gruden said. “We got what we wanted to do. We got about an eight-play drive together, went off the field, and it’s something to build off of.”

    2. Applying pressure: No, it wasn’t Tom Brady, who got the ball out at a lightning-fast pace in practice this past week, and yes, left guard Logan Mankins received the night off as well. But Washington’s defensive front controlled the line of scrimmage. The goal of this season is to get more pressure on the quarterback. Washington did that. Three players – Orakpo, rookie Trent Murphy and defensive end Chris Baker — recorded hits on the quarterback. (Speaking of Murphy, he did a good job of shedding blocks and making tackles in the run game. He was engaged with a lineman on both of his tackles, but he used his hands to shuck the blocker and slide over to grab the running back for the stop.) Orakpo generated a holding call on one rush. Then, later, he and Ryan Kerrigan worked together nicely as Kerrigan rushed from the left and forced Ryan Mallett to step up into the pocket – and into the arms of Orakpo. Just last week, Orakpo was talking about how Washington’s defensive players needed to get more team-work sacks, where multiple players are swarming and even if the quarterback eludes the first, another defender is there to get the stop.

    3. Running back use: Redskins backs combined for nine receptions for 81 yards on 11 targets against New England. Gruden has talked about the importance of having the running backs involved in the passing game because it makes the offense more well-rounded, and because good screen passes catch pass-rushers off guard and then prompt teams to scale back their pressure. Going to the running backs also gives the quarterback a safety valve. It looks as if Roy Helu Jr. has a leg up on the competition for the job of leading receiving threat out of the backfield. He had two nice catches and narrowly missed on a third. He looked as good in the open field as he has in recent years. This role seems to suit Helu. As a rusher he struggles to generate yardage when met at the line by a group of tacklers, but as a receiver he benefits from more space, where he can put his speed and shiftiness to use. Helu worked on improving his pass-catching skills this offseason; if he had no one else to work out with, his wife would throw him passes to help improve his hands. He said his goal was to get his pass-catching skills to the level of a wide receiver. We need to see more to get a feel for if he’s at this level yet, but he looked good in this capacity for one night. Gruden and Sean McVay have plenty of options, it seems, however. Silas Redd, Chris Thompson and Evan Royster also caught passes last night. Redd has a nice blend of speed and power, which would seem to make him a good challenger. But we need to see what he can do in pass protection, where coaches say Helu is the more advanced of all the backs. Thompson is shifty in space, but lacks power. Royster can be slippery, but he doesn’t have as quick of a sudden burst of acceleration. On another note, it was good to see Gruden display a commitment to running the ball. Right off the bat, the Redskins set the tone with a physical mindset as they put the ball in the hands of Morris. Players say that although Gruden is known for his work with quarterbacks, and that he’s a former quarterback himself, he definitely has the mindset and belief that offensive success begins with the rushing attack.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

  6. #21
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    4. Kicking competition: You don’t draft a kicker if you aren’t seriously considering a switch, but it’s also hard for a kicker to succeed as a rookie. However, in the practices leading up to the preseason opener, Zach Hocker has proven to be a worthy challenger for Forbath. Coaches were curious to see what would happen once the lights came on, and Hocker remained solid while Forbath struggled. The third-year pro demonstrated improved leg strength on one kickoff as he recorded a touchback. But he had another short kickoff, and then sent a third out of bounds. Forbath also nearly had two missed field goals. His 35-yard attempt in the first quarter bounced off the right goal post, but a penalty gave him another chance, which he made from 39 feet out. Forbath, who last week easily made a 60-yarder in practice, then missed a 46-yarder wide right and short. Hocker, meanwhile was perfect from 27 and 39 yards, recorded a touchback and made the new, longer point-after attempt. It’s only one game, and Hocker could struggle next week while Forbath rebounds. In practices, we’ve seen one have a good day while the other has some misses, and then the next day, they’ll flip-flop. They’ve both had perfect days twice. Forbath was frustrated with himself saying he didn’t have the focus he needed to and allowed himself to take his eyes off the ball for a split second when he made contact with it. “It’s a stupid thing, but luckily it happened now in the preseason rather than when it really counts,” he said. Now, when you’re battling for a job, every kick counts. But that’s how a kicker has to think as he tries to flush it from his memory and move onto the next kick. Hocker has a good demeanor and said he was surprised he didn’t feel more nervous in the game. He credited lessons from Forbath for his ability to maintain his focus and deal with the pressure. Gruden said Forbath obviously needed to make that kick, then praised Hocker for his kicks, and for the open-field tackle the rookie made. He added that this decision will come down to the final preseason game.

    5. Bubble-watch: Bacarri Rambo may have helped himself with the four tackles he recorded last night. His best play was probably when he raced downfield in run support and tackled running back Shane Vereen to hold him to a seven-yard gain. It doesn’t sound like much, but Rambo did not hesitate, he took the proper angle as Vereen turned the corner, and then did what Raheem Morris has been stressing: “Just get a body part and hold on.” A miss by Rambo in this situation would’ve meant a big pickup by the back. Rambo looked as if he played faster last night than he has even in practices. He almost had an interception, but couldn’t quite get to an underthrown ball. … Morgan Moses had a couple good plays at left tackle, but he also had a hold call while run-blocking, and then got beat a couple of times. … Josh LeRibeus missed a few blocks, and it looked as if he would lean to his left pre-snap on run plays going that way. That’s not the best idea because that means he’s starting off off-balanced if a defender got a great jump off the ball and drove him that way. … Third-string tackle Maurice Hurt had a couple of breakdowns both in pass and run blocking. … Will Compton (fighting for a job behind Perry Riley and Keenan Robinson) had a nice play in which he shot the gap and had a tackle behind the line of scrimmage. He seemed to show good pursuit on other run plays as well. And he made a play in pass coverage. … Fellow inside linebacker Akeem Jordan didn’t run well and lost his man in pass coverage. He did fine in run defense, however, and recovered a fumble. … Outside linebacker Adrian Robinson caused that fumble and recorded a quarterback pressure. … Cornerback Chase Minnifield drew a pass interference call that put the ball on the 4-yard line, but then he acquitted himself by breaking up a pass in the end zone on fourth-and-goal. … Fellow corner Peyton Thompson got picked on frequently. … Robinson had the good night that he needed as he battles for a roster spot behind Garcon, Jackson and Andre Roberts. He ran a variety of routes had three catches for 45 yards and touchdown. … Redd and Lache Seastrunk both made the most of their opportunities. Seastrunk had a couple of big gains on runs to the outside, but it doesn’t appear he likes to cut back to the inside. Redd, meanwhile showed versatility, picking up yards on stretch plays to the outside, and on runs between the tackles. … I don’t think rookie receiver Ryan Grant is on the bubble, but he had a good night with three catches for 37 yards. He showed an ability to create space for himself, and the ability to make a tough catch on a well-contested through. … Another receiver who could be on the bubble is Rashad Ross, but he did well for himself, recording a 37-yard kickoff return, and also had a 35-yard catch in tight coverage.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

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    Redskins-Patriots: Ten Observations, by John Keim

    LANDOVER, Md. -- Ten thoughts and observations from the Washington Redskins' 23-6 preseason opening win over the New England Patriots:

    1. The Patriots had quite a few starters who did not play, so you can't go overboard with what the Redskins did Thursday night. No parades down Constitution Avenue just yet. Really, it wasn't about the fact that they won -- it's meaningless -- but rather how the Redskins went about playing. They wanted to establish an identity and did so on both sides, playing physical on offense in particular. The Redskins won't become playoff contenders off this game, but if they start establishing a mindset, if they tackle like they did Thursday, then it's a good start. They took care of New England's backups, for the most part, and it sure beats the alternative for them.

    2. I'll have more on this Friday, but I liked that they wanted to run the ball. I know this is the preseason and they're missing their top two receivers and they weren't going to be fancy with the pass game. But it would be good for this team to establish an identity right away. And usually the mindset that wins is the one that relies on physical play and establishing the line of scrimmage. Fullback Darrel Young and tight end Logan Paulsen really helped Alfred Morris in the run game.

    3. There wasn't a whole lot to take from quarterback Robert Griffin III in only 10 plays. But the first impression was that he did most of what he needed to do. It was the basics: Get the team in and out of the huddle; get through your progressions. Coach Jay Gruden said he didn't have a lot of thoughts on Griffin's night. The plays were rather vanilla.

    4. One play that jumped out in a subtle way was when Griffin dumped a swing pass off to the right to running back Roy Helu for seven yards. It's what Griffin needed to show: The Patriots sent a blitz and dropped their defensive end. The linebacker took the Y receiver and the end dropping eliminated what Griffin wanted, a seam pass to tight end Jordan Reed. Griffin felt pressure so he quickly dumped it to Helu. "Trust what you see," Griffin said. "I saw it wasn't there so I moved on."

    5. Rookie receiver Ryan Grant showed up the same way he has shown up in practice. He ran good routes and made a terrific diving 18-yard catch, with a defender on him. Grant gained a little extra separation on a 6-yard catch by planting hard at the defender and coming back for the ball. The defender had to take a step back as Grant pushed forward, allowing him to run after the catch -- and that led to a 15-yard personal foul on the defender. Grant also had a catch-and-run on a shallow cross; they wanted to see him get yards after the catch Thursday.

    6. The backup running back battle will be an interesting one. Lache Seastrunk showed his speed and ability to bounce outside. He has a knack for shifting with speed and turning defenders around. Silas Redd has looked good in camp, but it's hard to get a good feel on backs in practice. But Redd ran physical at times. I liked that he tried to make a move one time in the open field, the defensive back wasn't fooled so Redd lowered his shoulder and got what he could.

    7. Despite their success, Helu has to be the No. 1 third-down back. He was the one facing the higher caliber of players. Liked how he made defenders miss. Helu said he worked on his hands quite a bit in the offseason -- catching passes from his wife in the park. "She started off rough, balls all over the place," he said. "Eventually she was throwing rockets ... I want to be a very good pass catcher."

    8. I'd find a spot for a guy like Trenton Robinson on the team. The kid plays hard and flies all over the place and comes up hard against the run. He likes the contact and it shows. Akeem Davis did a nice job covering one punt; that's how you earn a name as a young player. I want to watch more to see how Bacarri Rambo fared, but he did make a couple tackles. A good start it seems at least when it came to tackling.

    9. An early impression of the other rookies: Zach Hocker took an early lead on Kai Forbath for the kicking job; left tackle Morgan Moses had a holding penalty and other times was too upright, but I'd need to focus harder on him to get a stronger feel; guard Spencer Long had a couple rough plays in which he missed in protection, but did see him work to the second level in the run game; linebacker Trent Murphy didn't generate much pressure off the edge (saw him win inside though) and was beaten in coverage. However, I did see Murphy aggressively take on a lead blocker and force a run back inside to traffic for a short gain.

    10. Liked the decisive throw by Kirk Cousins on the touchdown pass to Aldrick Robinson. What helped: a shallow cross by Santana Moss that caused the safety to lean the other way, allowing Cousins to squeeze the ball to Robinson. Cousins took an unnecessary shot to Robinson in double coverage another time. But Robinson showed up in this game and continues to please the coaches. He's always a summer all-star, but that's good enough to win roster spots.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

  8. #23
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    Film review: Redskins' offense, by John Keim

    A few thoughts and observations after re-watching the preseason game vs. New England:

    Yes, Kirk Cousins was decisive with his throws, a lot of getting to his plant step and then throwing the ball. Very decisive on his touchdown pass to Aldrick Robinson. Cousins also forced a first-down throw into double coverage to Robinson, who was never open on the play -- and there wasn’t enough room to throw him open, either. On this bootleg pass, Robinson is typically not the first read.

    Initially on Robinson’s touchdown pass I thought the shallow cross by Santana Moss prompted the safety to cheat to his right a little, opening the window for the throw. But it was the Jordan Reed effect instead. Reed, tight to the left, started upfield then turned out. The safety anticipated, it appears, a seam route so he took a step or two to the right to combat. That’s what having good targets can do for other receivers. Subtle.

    Robinson has had good preseason games each of the past two seasons, so let’s not go overboard. But he did run good routes and, on the play-action pass that he caught deep in his own territory, his speed created an opening for yards after the catch. His speed will keep him around.

    Center Kory Lichtensteiger had a good week working against Vince Wilfork in a team setting and that carried over into Thursday’s game. On consecutive run plays, Lichtensteiger got Wilfork to stand up (or he was just being lazy with his technique and did it on his own).

    Robert Griffin III was fine; nothing great, nothing horrible. A few things he can learn from. Griffin did a solid job getting the ball out and not taking any hits. In fact, the quarterbacks were unbelievably clean all night in part because of when they delivered the ball. One of the slower releases by Griffin took 2.6 seconds, which isn’t bad at all; that resulted in a swing pass to the right to Roy Helu after the first two options were taken away by New England’s defense. On the throw, Griffin moved his feet better in the pocket.

    Griffin threw to Robinson in the corner of the end zone after hitting his third step in his drop. Griffin got away with a dangerous throw on a swing to Alfred Morris. Griffin stared at him the whole way and the corner, who had been sinking into coverage, read his eyes. Good thing for Griffin the ball was off target.

    Right tackle Tom Compton does not look ready to challenge Tyler Polumbus for the starting job; hasn’t appeared that way in practice or in the game. Compton did not give up any quarterback hits or anything, but there were a couple issues against backups -- allowing defenders to get into his body; losing the edge -- that against starters would be tough.

    The rookie linemen, guard Spencer Long and tackle Morgan Moses, both had ups and downs as you would expect. Long still needs to adapt to reading defenses, and the player in front of him and anticipating their rush. Long whiffed on a swim move by one Patriot and then failed to get his hands on him on the next rush as well. He did move well, as he has shown in the past, and worked to the linebackers just fine, but he's still learning.

    The same is true of Moses. When he can drive his legs he does well -- he doesn’t always do this -- but he also had awkward feet on some rushes, which would lead to trouble against starters. Didn’t get his feet around on one block, causing him to lose the defender. Still needs to play lower. Moses also can’t let his hands get too wide when engaging defenders; got him in trouble once or twice. Again, a work in progress as the Redskins anticipated. His size someday could help.

    The young running backs fared well, but neither was tested in protection. Roy Helu is much more proven in the pass game right now. However, both Silas Redd and Lache Seastrunk flashed Thursday, both showing the ability to make defenders miss: Redd with physical runs; Seastrunk with speed. Seastrunk did not break tackles, but he got to the outside fast enough a few times that he was rarely touched until he was tackled. Did not gain yards after contact when running inside; too upright at times. Still, both flashed more than Chris Thompson. Redd had a good catch-and-run on a screen pass.

    Seastrunk hits the hole ultra-fast. At times you wonder if it’s too fast, preventing the ability to set up the linebacker for the cutback. But the Patriots’ backups were getting to the hole fast -- just in case -- and still allowing cutback lanes. Would starters react this way? Helu’s impatience results in clogged cutback lanes too often. Seastrunk will have to learn to press the hole better, especially against better defenders. But that speed…

    Redd was mixed between the tackles, a couple times going down right away but then other times lowering his shoulder, falling forward and getting an extra yard or two. Redd did a good job when running around the end of lowering his shoulder and getting a couple extra yards; it was not the same as Alfred Morris in 2012 trucking a starting linebacker but it was a good start for an undrafted free agent.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

  9. #24
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    Film review: Redskins' defense, by John Keim

    Just a few observations after re-watching the Washington Redskins' defense against New England. Again, so many starters missing from the Patriots that you have to keep it in mind, but still have to try and evaluate players, so here are a few thoughts:

    I loved Brian Orakpo's sack because it was a team effort. First, Ryan Kerrigan pinched Patriots quarterback Ryan Mallett up in the pocket with a good outside rush. For what it’s worth I saw Kerrigan using a technique Brian Baker has emphasized. Kerrigan turned the corner on the tackle with his right arm up and inside his man. At the top of his rush, he did what Baker has focused on: He dropped his arm hard, returning his weight to his hips. Anyway, it worked. He pinched Mallett. Then, tackle Jarvis Jenkins had collapsed the pocket so Mallett had no room to step up, and Orakpo finished it by getting inside the left tackle -- he had beaten him a couple times outside, so the tackle set wide and Orakpo took him up and then in. Teamwork. Sack.

    I have written that most plays I’ve seen rookie linebacker Trent Murphy make have come when he has attacked inside. Same was true Thursday. He ducked inside the right tackle to make a tackle for a loss. I think he surprises blockers by how low he can play. Murphy did not look comfortable in coverage; he did do this in college, but it’s a different ballgame here of course. But I liked how he took on the lead blocker on one run. And I liked how he attacked the guard on one rush, at his outside shoulder. The guard turned outside a bit. File that away for a possible stunt with Kerrigan.

    Linebacker Perry Riley played fast in his limited snaps. He missed a tackle on the first play of the game, but he shot through the gap hard. And he was picked up by a group of teammates who made sure it didn’t turn into a long gain and limited the back to two yards. Gang tackling is always good. Riley also filled the hole hard on the second play (I wrote about Robinson’s success on this play here).

    Trenton Robinson loves contact. I could give you a list of examples. But I’ll leave it at this: he loves contact.

    OK, a little more on him: He helped on three plays when the Pats had the ball at the Redskins' 2-yard line. He came from the backside to help Will Compton make a tackle (good job by Compton here). He was in coverage on a pass high over the middle. And he flew up hard on a run to his right to get in on the stop. The part that he will have to watch (though I don’t know what his job was on this play in fairness): Being too aggressive. He was in coverage over the middle on fourth down when quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo started upfield -- but he was still several yards behind the line of scrimmage. Robinson raced at him, but Garoppolo slid to the right, kept the play alive and threw back to the middle. Cornerback Chase Minnifield defended on the play, but it was the area that Robinson had been positioned.

    Nose tackle Barry Cofield held a double team on the second play of the game, allowing Riley to run free. But Cofield was too upright on a swim move, allowing the center to stop him (next to him: Chris Baker was lower and drove his man back).

    This has nothing to do with defense, but it does involve a defensive player. Linebacker Adam Hayward had a terrific block on Rashad Ross' 37-yard kickoff return. Held his ground, allowing Ross to make a cut and keep going. Others made nice blocks too: Niles Paul and, at the end of the run, Robinson. But Hayward's was huge.

    Bacarri Rambo was more competitive and aggressive than a year ago. This needs to continue, but it was a good start. I liked what he did on a couple plays in particular. On a second-quarter run the receiver came out to block him. He launched into the receiver, keeping his eyes on the ball carrier. He shed the block and helped on the play. Later, Rambo shed another block from the same receiver (Brandon LaFell) and tripped up the runner. Need to see more from him, but it was a stronger start than last summer.
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

  10. #25
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    OK I"ve seen more now. I've been big on Chris Thompson since they drafted him but Seastrunk will win that battle. Halu looked solid and Royster shouldn't be on an NFL roster anyway. So those are my 3 RBs on the final cuts.

    ST are still giving up big kickoffs although there was an obvious clip missed call on the big one where the NE returner fumbled.

    I didn't see Robinson making the team, still don't, but he played well.
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  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by duck View Post
    I just timed all the throws Griff made...the first one was the longest at nearly three seconds. The others were less than 2.5 each...in the first preseason game.
    Nice................
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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell Green Fan View Post
    Halu looked solid
    And Dave is already in mid-season form........
    "If it ain't broke don't fix it" @ Daniel Snyder

  13. #28
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    Whatever. When he becomes a real player I"ll learn how to spell his name. Never had that problem with John Hall
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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell Green Fan View Post
    OK I"ve seen more now. I've been big on Chris Thompson since they drafted him but Seastrunk will win that battle. Halu looked solid and Royster shouldn't be on an NFL roster anyway. So those are my 3 RBs on the final cuts.

    ST are still giving up big kickoffs although there was an obvious clip missed call on the big one where the NE returner fumbled.

    I didn't see Robinson making the team, still don't, but he played well.
    Yeah CThompson doesn't seem like he's going to stick. Can't get/stay healthy, other new guys performing well. RBs will be Morris, Helu(Halo) and Redd or Seastrunk. WR is also turning out to have some better depth than last year, obviously adding two FAs (Djax and AR) helps but Ryan Grant looks like he could stick. That leaves two out of the three between Moss or Aldrick or Hanky out. Final WRs may look like this:

    Garcon
    DJax
    Andre Roberts
    AR15 (Aldrick)
    Grant

    If we keep 6, its hard to say who that would be. Moss is old, Hanky is broken and doesn't play STs, but if we keep 6 I guess Moss stays. Otherwise I see him being cut.
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