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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Duchy of Grand Fenwick
    Posts
    34,054

    Terrorist watchlist guidelines

    https://firstlook.org/theintercept/a...3/blacklisted/

    This is really extreme. The quote below is just one of many troublesome ones.

    The guidelines provide the clearest explanation yet of what is happening when Americans and foreigners are pulled aside at airports and border crossings by government agents. The fifth chapter, titled “Encounter Management and Analysis,” details the type of information that is targeted for collection during “encounters” with people on the watchlists, as well as the different organizations that should collect the data. The Department of Homeland Security is described as having the largest number of encounters, but other authorities, ranging from the State Department and Coast Guard to foreign governments and “certain private entities,” are also involved in assembling “encounter packages” when watchlisted individuals cross their paths. The encounters can be face-to-face meetings or electronic interactions—for instance, when a watchlisted individual applies for a visa.

    In addition to data like fingerprints, travel itineraries, identification documents and gun licenses, the rules encourage screeners to acquire health insurance information, drug prescriptions, “any cards with an electronic strip on it (hotel cards, grocery cards, gift cards, frequent flyer cards),” cellphones, email addresses, binoculars, peroxide, bank account numbers, pay stubs, academic transcripts, parking and speeding tickets, and want ads. The digital information singled out for collection includes social media accounts, cell phone lists, speed dial numbers, laptop images, thumb drives, iPods, Kindles, and cameras. All of the information is then uploaded to the TIDE database.

    Screeners are also instructed to collect data on any “pocket litter,” scuba gear, EZ Passes, library cards, and the titles of any books, along with information about their condition—”e.g., new, dog-eared, annotated, unopened.” Business cards and conference materials are also targeted, as well as “anything with an account number” and information about any gold or jewelry worn by the watchlisted individual. Even “animal information”—details about pets from veterinarians or tracking chips—is requested. The rulebook also encourages the collection of biometric or biographical data about the travel partners of watchlisted individuals.
    APF doesn't come in screaming at others about how stupid they are. APF doesn't spam NST with the same tired topic 30 times a month. APF doesn't link to some kook in his mom's basement telling you how to, "Be afraid. Be very afraid" of the world falling down around you. And, when APF is proven wrong, he acknowledges he made a mistake and moves on, rather than harping about "sheeple."

    -- Cory Bonini

    Welchie summarized

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Undisclosed Location
    Posts
    8,622
    Quote Originally Posted by AndromedaPatFan View Post
    https://firstlook.org/theintercept/a...3/blacklisted/

    The guidelines provide the clearest explanation yet of what is happening when Americans and foreigners are pulled aside at airports and border crossings by government agents. The fifth chapter, titled “Encounter Management and Analysis,” details the type of information that is targeted for collection during “encounters” with people on the watchlists, as well as the different organizations that should collect the data. The Department of Homeland Security is described as having the largest number of encounters, but other authorities, ranging from the State Department and Coast Guard to foreign governments and “certain private entities,” are also involved in assembling “encounter packages” when watchlisted individuals cross their paths. The encounters can be face-to-face meetings or electronic interactions—for instance, when a watchlisted individual applies for a visa.

    In addition to data like fingerprints, travel itineraries, identification documents and gun licenses, the rules encourage screeners to acquire health insurance information, drug prescriptions, “any cards with an electronic strip on it (hotel cards, grocery cards, gift cards, frequent flyer cards),” cellphones, email addresses, binoculars, peroxide, bank account numbers, pay stubs, academic transcripts, parking and speeding tickets, and want ads. The digital information singled out for collection includes social media accounts, cell phone lists, speed dial numbers, laptop images, thumb drives, iPods, Kindles, and cameras. All of the information is then uploaded to the TIDE database.

    Screeners are also instructed to collect data on any “pocket litter,” scuba gear, EZ Passes, library cards, and the titles of any books, along with information about their condition—”e.g., new, dog-eared, annotated, unopened.” Business cards and conference materials are also targeted, as well as “anything with an account number” and information about any gold or jewelry worn by the watchlisted individual. Even “animal information”—details about pets from veterinarians or tracking chips—is requested. The rulebook also encourages the collection of biometric or biographical data about the travel partners of watchlisted individuals.

    Read more: http://forums.kffl.com/newreply.php?...#ixzz38VvvyvCS


    This is really extreme. The quote below is just one of many troublesome ones.
    Peroxide? Why peroxide?

    They must be on the lookout for people about to or have changed the color of their hair?
    "Jesus is ideal and wonderful, but you Christians -- you are not like him."

    -Gandhi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Grand Rapids MI
    Posts
    5,610
    Pretty sure I am on the terrorist watchlist. Every time i go anywhere with screening, I get singled out for the "random" check. Including the last 4 times I have flown (only 4 times in the past 15 years ish) and both times I drove onto an army base.

    About 18 years ago my luggage got "lost" while flying back from Cancun and when it was mailed to me about a week later my electric razor was stuck in the on position and it was out of batteries. I'm assuming the bag buzzed when they threw it around like airport workers do and it got singled out.

    Also about 17 years ago my wallet was stolen. Then the FBI called me up and asked me to voluntarily come in for questioning and they had me write a paragraph and sign my name like 15 times, then had a handwriting analysis done. Then when they determined it wasn't me that was cashing hundreds of checks for thousands of dollars each over a 5 state area all in my name, and asked if I knew anything about it.

    I'm assuming one of those things got me on the stupid inconvenience list. Luckily it's not strip searches and body checks just take your shoes off and get patted down and have the dog sniff you and your car. Also luckily I don't fly often or go to military bases.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    31,343
    Wonderful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    The High Seas
    Posts
    37,593
    Quote Originally Posted by Edonidd View Post
    Pretty sure I am on the terrorist watchlist. Every time i go anywhere with screening, I get singled out for the "random" check. Including the last 4 times I have flown (only 4 times in the past 15 years ish) and both times I drove onto an army base.

    About 18 years ago my luggage got "lost" while flying back from Cancun and when it was mailed to me about a week later my electric razor was stuck in the on position and it was out of batteries. I'm assuming the bag buzzed when they threw it around like airport workers do and it got singled out.

    Also about 17 years ago my wallet was stolen. Then the FBI called me up and asked me to voluntarily come in for questioning and they had me write a paragraph and sign my name like 15 times, then had a handwriting analysis done. Then when they determined it wasn't me that was cashing hundreds of checks for thousands of dollars each over a 5 state area all in my name, and asked if I knew anything about it.

    I'm assuming one of those things got me on the stupid inconvenience list. Luckily it's not strip searches and body checks just take your shoes off and get patted down and have the dog sniff you and your car. Also luckily I don't fly often or go to military bases.

    Such is the life of a swashbuckling Secret Agent Man.
    Gang Way!

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