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  1. #46
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    31,606
    Quote Originally Posted by Fandango View Post
    I doubt it either Xulu, but again hindsight is 20/20. PV's point seems to be "accept ANY salary the team offers you, because it is still more than nothing AND you should be thankful that you are getting paid to play a sport". That is naive way of looking at it. Aiken was the #1 pick in the draft, and had verbally agreed to a contract with the Astros. I think that he was well within his rights to expect to be paid according to the position he was drafted AND to have some belief that the Astros would want to honor (or near honor) the non-binding verbal agreement they made with him.

    Instead they lowballed him, offering $5 million instead of $6.8 million. If he should just take $5 million, shut up and by happy what would stop the Astros from offering $3 million...or $1 million? Its still a lot of money, so maybe Aiken just should "shut up and take the deal" at that point too?

    Yeah he had a risky elbow situation, but sh*t, that is just the reality of being a professional pitcher at this point in history. A pretty large percentage of players are going to have that injury at some point in time, and it can be both young and old guys, and guys that have supposedly great mechanics as well.
    All fair points. I didn't know if the bolded actually happened from what Q linked.

    Maybe I'm making things up in my head, but don't the Astros have some recent history of being relatively sketchy as an organization? Regardless, it seems like the agent is at least partially to blame. If an offer is on the table, demand it in writing.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    The Twin Cities of Minnesota
    Posts
    28,348
    From what I know, which isn't too much, I thought that the verbal agreement was made prior to him being drafted #1 overall. I think that the Astros were considering multiple players with the 1/1 pick, and only wanted to take a guy that they had a pre-agreement with, to ensure signability. But Aiken couldn't actually sign the contract until he was chosen by the team. Then sometime after the pre-agreement was made, this elbow irregularity was discovered.
    "We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be."
    -Kurt Vonnegut "Mother Night"

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    36,827
    Quote Originally Posted by Fandango View Post
    I doubt it either Xulu, but again hindsight is 20/20. PV's point seems to be "accept ANY salary the team offers you, because it is still more than nothing AND you should be thankful that you are getting paid to play a sport". That is naive way of looking at it. Aiken was the #1 pick in the draft, and had verbally agreed to a contract with the Astros. I think that he was well within his rights to expect to be paid according to the position he was drafted AND to have some belief that the Astros would want to honor (or near honor) the non-binding verbal agreement they made with him.

    Instead they lowballed him, offering $5 million instead of $6.8 million. If he should just take $5 million, shut up and by happy what would stop the Astros from offering $3 million...or $1 million? Its still a lot of money, so maybe Aiken just should "shut up and take the deal" at that point too?

    Yeah he had a risky elbow situation, but sh*t, that is just the reality of being a professional pitcher at this point in history. A pretty large percentage of players are going to have that injury at some point in time, and it can be both young and old guys, and guys that have supposedly great mechanics as well.
    I never said he should accept ANY salary but $5M is $5M. Risk has a price. It was a bad move that agents should really be ashamed of.

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