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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouse View Post
    Fuller definitely has the best ability out of the CBs to move to safety.
    Watkins and Exum fit that mold nicely too (as well as having experience there in college). as do later guys like Bennett Jackson or Walt Aikens.
    Your Chicago Bears: still learning about this newfangled thing called the "forward pass."

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by toooverbearing View Post
    Agreed. Although with Brandon Hardin (and Gabe Carimi and Chris Williams the OT) hopefully the bigger lesson learned was not to draft someone with a significant injury history.
    What was Carimi's injury history? I don't recall that being one of his red flags out of college.

    I hate how guys who have catastrophic injuries their first or second years get labeled as "busts" Enis's knee was shredded...he came back and did everything the coaches asked (put on weight to play FB, etc) but it didn't change the fact that his knee was done.

    I remember watching the game that took out Colombo. I sat watching the replay thinking a guy that big does not recover from an injury like that.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaSuperfan View Post
    I thought he learned his lesson of trying to convert a CB to a S when he drafted Brandon Hardin.
    That's the same lesson SF and Pittsburgh learned with Ronnie Lott and Rod Woodson, eh?

    Comparing Fuller to Lott and Woodson is grossly unfair to everyone involved, but comparing him to Hardin isn't any better IMSO. Fuller's had tons of success playing safety and even linebacker: like Lott and Woodson, he's done it already. Hardin was athletic enough to look like a CB and big enough to look like a safety, but he didn't have the skills or track record to actually play, well, anywhere as a pro. He was a coach-'em-up gamble, for a team that didn't coach anyone up. Fuller's a plug-him-in investment.
    That the world is explicable is miraculous, and so explanations need not be the undoing of miracles.

    We never learn anything, never in the world, and in spite of all the history books written. Thereís a regular warehouse of fine suggestions, and if weíre not better it isnít because there arenít plenty of marvelous and true ideas to draw on, but because our vanity weighs more than all of them put together.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamus34 View Post
    What was Carimi's injury history? I don't recall that being one of his red flags out of college.
    Missed a few games as a sophomore with a knee injury, but started the others. And he tweaked his right knee (the one he later dislocated) as a junior, but didn't miss any time.

    For that matter, Hardin broke his shoulder, which shouldn't have been a lingering deal unless arthritis or avascular necrosis or somesuch crept in. I'd keep him on the list, though, because defenders who tackle like fourth-graders are going to get hurt one way or another.

    I hate how guys who have catastrophic injuries their first or second years get labeled as "busts" Enis's knee was shredded...he came back and did everything the coaches asked (put on weight to play FB, etc) but it didn't change the fact that his knee was done.

    I remember watching the game that took out Colombo. I sat watching the replay thinking a guy that big does not recover from an injury like that.
    Totally agreed. Injuries just happen. It's that kind of game. I'm angry that Enis and Carimi and Colombo got hurt, too, but anyone could've sustained those injuries (especially Enis' and Colombo's--Carimi might have had some structural weakness in that knee by 2011). No need to blow off steam by pretending that our GM should've seen it coming, or that injuries somehow reflect on players' character (Enis' personality kinda obscured the fact that he really did seem to rehab the heck out of that knee).
    That the world is explicable is miraculous, and so explanations need not be the undoing of miracles.

    We never learn anything, never in the world, and in spite of all the history books written. Thereís a regular warehouse of fine suggestions, and if weíre not better it isnít because there arenít plenty of marvelous and true ideas to draw on, but because our vanity weighs more than all of them put together.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamus34 View Post
    What was Carimi's injury history? I don't recall that being one of his red flags out of college.

    I hate how guys who have catastrophic injuries their first or second years get labeled as "busts" Enis's knee was shredded...he came back and did everything the coaches asked (put on weight to play FB, etc) but it didn't change the fact that his knee was done.

    I remember watching the game that took out Colombo. I sat watching the replay thinking a guy that big does not recover from an injury like that.
    Here's one quote from the Trib:

    Angelo acknowledged right tackle Gabe Carimi came with a yellow flag last year when he was selected with the 29th overall pick. Carimi underwent two surgeries on his knee and is expected back at full strength.
    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2...ns-gabe-carimi

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by karhu View Post
    That's the same lesson SF and Pittsburgh learned with Ronnie Lott and Rod Woodson, eh?

    Comparing Fuller to Lott and Woodson is grossly unfair to everyone involved, but comparing him to Hardin isn't any better IMSO. Fuller's had tons of success playing safety and even linebacker: like Lott and Woodson, he's done it already. Hardin was athletic enough to look like a CB and big enough to look like a safety, but he didn't have the skills or track record to actually play, well, anywhere as a pro. He was a coach-'em-up gamble, for a team that didn't coach anyone up. Fuller's a plug-him-in investment.
    That's a fair point. Maybe Hardin wasn't a great example. But I just think it'd be more natural if the Bears used their 1st round pick on a Safety, that this player played at the Safety position for the majority of his college career. For example, if the Bears drafted Fuller, I'd much rather see him play CB than the Bears coaching staff trying to convert him into a Safety (even if he played some Safety in college). The bulk of his time at Va. Tech was at corner - I'd just like to see the player the Bears draft play the position he played well at in college.

    This is no way a knock against Fuller. I think Fuller is one of the top CB's in this draft, I guess I don't know how well he'd project at Safety in the pros. Maybe Emery and his staff see something that we don't.
    Last edited by DaSuperfan; 05-02-2014 at 05:19 PM.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaSuperfan View Post
    That's a fair point. Maybe Hardin wasn't a great example. But I just think it'd be more natural if the Bears used their 1st round pick on a Safety, that this player played at the Safety position for the majority of his college career. For example, if the Bears drafted Fuller, I'd much rather see him play CB than the Bears coaching staff trying to convert him into a Safety (even if he played some Safety in college). The bulk of his time at Va. Tech was at corner - I'd just like to see the player the Bears draft play the position he played well at in college.

    This is no way a knock against Fuller. I think Fuller is one of the top CB's in this draft, I guess I don't know how well he'd project at Safety in the pros. Maybe Emery and his staff see something that we don't.
    I know using the Shea McClellin phenomenon in a positive light at this point doesn't help anyone's arguments, but in this case, one benefit to trying to convert a successful corner into a safety is the fact that if it doesn't work, we will need a CB next year anyway. I know... we don't know if McClellin will be a successful LB or not, and he might. But the plan B for Fuller, being the replacement for Peanut in 2015, is promising if he's selected this year but doesn't pan out as a safety. Of course, the short term downside is we don't have a very good FS assuming Conte can't pull himself together when all is said and done.

  8. #38
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    this might help.
    Your Chicago Bears: still learning about this newfangled thing called the "forward pass."

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