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  1. #1
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    Economic benefit of hosting the Super Bowl

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  2. #2
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    Not surprising. Once you consider the additional costs, opportunity costs, etc., I doubt it's much different than a regular game. I wouldn't be surprised if SB XLVIII actually cost NY/NJ money.

  3. #3
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    But think of the prestige!
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  4. #4
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    I think that a Super Bowl in NYC (NJ) would have a much different economic effect than say, a Super Bowl in Kansas City or Minneapolis. NYC in itself is a tourist draw most times of year, and also has a seemingly endless series of events/performances/attractions that draw in visitors. Some of these other locations, not so much.
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  5. #5
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    The Real Question here is did Lawrence Taylor's Pimp and Drug Dealer benefit? And the guy who writes his autobiographies.
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  6. #6
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    Why do you think that every major city in the country dumps millions upon millions into their convention centers?

    If you get a group of outside people into your city, the local economic impact is huge. The larger the group the better. The larger the party the better. And there isn't a party larger than the SB.

    People who say that hosting an event like a SB isn't big for a local economy are complete morons who have no idea how small businesses run. I used to work for a company that literally only existed because it won a bid on a project for the 1985 all star game. There are numerous, numerous things that take place during a SB that are the largest jobs for many, many different types of companies in the area that those companies will have in a 5 year period.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fandango View Post
    I think that a Super Bowl in NYC (NJ) would have a much different economic effect than say, a Super Bowl in Kansas City or Minneapolis. NYC in itself is a tourist draw most times of year, and also has a seemingly endless series of events/performances/attractions that draw in visitors. Some of these other locations, not so much.
    I would not be so sure....

    Most major sporting events do not provide any economic benefit, at best a temporary boost to some sections of the economy (and occasionaly a burden on others), but usually this is off set by the investment (bribery) needed to get the event in the first place. The Olympics and Soccer World Championships are notorious money dumps. Most sports world championships fall in this category as well. A major impact is where the revenues go (for soccer and the Olympics for instance the FIFA and big corporations rather than the local economy).

    Not sure how it works out for the Super Bowl, but I would not be surprised...
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fandango View Post
    I think that a Super Bowl in NYC (NJ) would have a much different economic effect than say, a Super Bowl in Kansas City or Minneapolis. NYC in itself is a tourist draw most times of year, and also has a seemingly endless series of events/performances/attractions that draw in visitors. Some of these other locations, not so much.
    That cuts both ways though. NYC already has the tourism draw, so it can also better accommodate an infusion of 80K+ people. I can't speak to Minneapolis, but there simply aren't that many hotel rooms in KC, especially not when you consider regular business/event travel. It's hard enough to find a room when there's a Chiefs' home game, and that's with a lot of local attendants. The biggest draw of outside people we have is probably NASCAR, which is a significant # of people, but good luck finding a hotel anywhere near the city, and Kansas City is pretty spread out to begin with. Then on top of that you factor in the location of Arrowhead...

    It's a lot of revenue, but it would be spread out over a huge area, while a significant majority of the burden would fall on KCMO, which quite frankly, it can't afford.

    Then of course there are the infrastructural burdens...

    I think the Big 12 Tourney is a much better event for KC than the SB would be, and that's every year.
    Last edited by Xulu Bak; 02-03-2014 at 05:50 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ducky View Post
    Why do you think that every major city in the country dumps millions upon millions into their convention centers?

    If you get a group of outside people into your city, the local economic impact is huge. The larger the group the better. The larger the party the better. And there isn't a party larger than the SB.

    People who say that hosting an event like a SB isn't big for a local economy are complete morons who have no idea how small businesses run. I used to work for a company that literally only existed because it won a bid on a project for the 1985 all star game. There are numerous, numerous things that take place during a SB that are the largest jobs for many, many different types of companies in the area that those companies will have in a 5 year period.
    Just because something is good for some local businesses does not mean it's good for all, nor does it mean it's good for the local economy (i.e., the city) as a whole. You're not accounting for the expense of hosting such an event, the infrastructural burdens, the opportunity costs, etc.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DutchBird View Post
    I would not be so sure....

    Most major sporting events do not provide any economic benefit, at best a temporary boost to some sections of the economy (and occasionaly a burden on others), but usually this is off set by the investment (bribery) needed to get the event in the first place.
    I agree. I was just commenting on the idea that the economic boost associated with hosting athletic events is not the same at every city, that is to say nothing of the economic expense required to host such an event.

    While the Super Bowl does not meausre up to the economic outlays that are required to host an Olympics or World Cup, for many cities there is still something that is needed. In the Minneapolis example, if the city is chosen to host the Super Bowl it would only be because of the fact that the Vikings got a new stadium that was paid for with over $500 million in public subsidies.
    Last edited by Fandango; 02-04-2014 at 05:00 PM.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xulu Bak View Post
    That cuts both ways though. NYC already has the tourism draw, so it can also better accommodate an infusion of 80K+ people. I can't speak to Minneapolis, but there simply aren't that many hotel rooms in KC, especially not when you consider regular business/event travel. It's hard enough to find a room when there's a Chiefs' home game, and that's with a lot of local attendants. The biggest draw of outside people we have is probably NASCAR, which is a significant # of people, but good luck finding a hotel anywhere near the city, and Kansas City is pretty spread out to begin with.
    True, but I was speaking more KC as a comparative rather than specific example, of course I probably shouldn't have mentioned that city in my initial post in the thread then.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fandango View Post
    I agree. I was just commenting on the idea that the economic boost associated with hosting athletic events is not the same at every city, that is to say nothing of the economic expense required to host such an event.

    While the Super Bowl does not meausre up to the economic outlays that are required to host an Olympics or World Cup, for many cities there is still something that is needed. In the Minneapolis example, if the city is chosen to host the Super Bowl it would only be because of the fact that the Vikings got a new stadium that was paid for with over $500 million in public subsidies.
    Add to that, even though I think the solution to be inefficient and extremely annoying, the light rail system would also be a significant feather in the cap for a SB bid. Direct access from the airport to the stadium & surrounding downtown hotels. The light rail was of course a huge public boondoggle which hasn't come close to breaking even yet in annual costs / receipts yet.
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