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Thread: Big Hurt

  1. #1
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    Big Hurt

    I apologize for posting here, but he deserves a congratulatory thread. He was my favorite player of all time and now he's a 1st ballot Hall of Fame player. Completely deserving.

    One of the best baseball players to ever wear a Chicago uniform.

    You can put it on the board!!! YES!!

  2. #2
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    Damn straight. At one point, he was the final piece of a puzzle that won a lot of guys win free drinks in bar bets:

    Eleven players have been named MVP in consecutive years. They form a complete lineup. Who are they?

    Anyway, I loved watching him play. Shoot, Thomas was one of a handful of batters Ted Williams said he'd ever really enjoyed watching hit.

    I remember him hitting a broken-bat HR to win a game once. But mostly I remember being in awe of the guy's patience, poise, and eye, when he could've gone Conseco or McGwire and just mashed HRs.

    Speaking of whom (and of Barry Bighead Bonds, too), Thomas did it the right way. That's my favorite thing of all.
    That the world is explicable is miraculous, and so explanations need not be the undoing of miracles.

    After you talk about the hole in her nipple, where do you go with it? You’ve got nothing.

  3. #3
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    I'm a Cubs fan.

    Frank Thomas was easily one of my two favorite baseball players when I was a kid.

  4. #4
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    Not a fan of baseball in general much less either Chicago team(worked near comiskey for years, lived west of wrigley :( ) but always liked Frank Thomas.
    A man like Emery doesn't need a search firm. He is the search firm. - Jon Greenberg.

  5. #5
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    I'm not a baseball fan for at least the past 10 years (probably longer) but my two takeaways from this years HOF joke...er vote is:

    1) Surprised FT was a first ballot guy. I knew he had a pretty good career...but I didn't necessarily think it was a 1st time HOF career. Nothing against the big hurt, and as I stated my knowledge of baseball is dubious at best, but that kind of surprised me.

    2) How the HELL was Maddox NOT an unanimous first ticket? Just shows how crooked and corrupt the whole HOF business really is.
    The two-wheeled scourge of the streets

  6. #6
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    I loved Frank Thomas and I'm a Cubs fan too. I remember I had his Leaf Rookie card and kept it in this protective baseball card case....it got stolen from me a few years after and I'm still pissed about it some 20 years later.
    "Nationalism is power hunger tempered by self-deception." - George Orwell

  7. #7
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    I had a couple of those too... I wonder what thats worth now

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamus34 View Post
    I'm not a baseball fan for at least the past 10 years (probably longer) but my two takeaways from this years HOF joke...er vote is:

    1) Surprised FT was a first ballot guy. I knew he had a pretty good career...but I didn't necessarily think it was a 1st time HOF career. Nothing against the big hurt, and as I stated my knowledge of baseball is dubious at best, but that kind of surprised me.

    2) How the HELL was Maddox NOT an unanimous first ticket? Just shows how crooked and corrupt the whole HOF business really is.
    1) if you look at the stats he is a first ballot, but it's surprising that they got it right. I'm sure some of it is a statement on the steroid era. I think in a vacuum he probably would've been a 2nd ballot judging on history of the voters, but in the last few years the voters are making a big statement on PEDs.

    2) Nolan Ryan got something like 98.6% so if a guy with 300+ wins (largely on terrible teams), the all time strike out king, and a guy who threw 6 no hitters wasn't unanimous it's not surprising from that point of view. From a rationale thinking point of view it is inconceivable that he wasn't unanimous. But some crotchety old bastages won't first ballot anyone.
    Basic, yes, but it was something we rarely saw under former Bears coordinator Ron Turner. Turner's idea of in-game adjustments involved his boxer shorts. -Rick Morrissey.

  9. #9
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    It's not Frank Thomas' fault that Baseball let him play half games. I'm sure he could have put together a HOF career as a below-average first baseman. As things stand, however, he was not a baseball player. He was a hitter.

  10. #10
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    He did play 971 games at First Base with a .990 Fielding %...so, not as bad as most of you think.

    He's the only player in MLB history to have 7 consecutive seasons with a .300 average, 100 walks, 100 runs, 100 rbi, and 20 HR's. Pretty astonishing.

    Only 5 players in history hit more HR and had a higher BA....Hank Aaron, Jimmie Foxx, Babe Ruth, Willie Mays and Manny.

    Also, he was an advocate of drug testing. He VOLUNTEERED to be tested, and was the only player to voluntarily be interviewed for the Mitchell report.

    Yes, he played a lot of DH, but he's also one of the top 10 hitters in the History of baseball.

    He's easily a 1st ballot HOF and one of the best all-time.

  11. #11
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    Mickey covered the numbers pretty well. From where I'm sitting, here's the list of players who hit for better power as efficiently as Thomas:

    Babe Ruth

    That's it. And Ruth had some help around him in the lineup, to put it mildly. When you only have Ruth to look up to, it shouldn't surprise anyone that most sportswriters know it.

    He had damned near the biggest strike zone since Dave Winfield, and Thomas still worked pitchers like a leadoff hitter. He could've played like a beer-league slugger (which is to say, like a Bonds or Canseco or McGwire or Sosa) and still made a fortune...but he decided to play the game at its absolute zenith. Rather than making his game all about power, he used his power to inform his game. Pitchers who'd be happy to let anyone else go to the opposite field knew that Thomas could annihilate them that way. Pitchers who had a leg up on every other power hitter in the league knew that, however unfairly, the most powerful batter in MLB also had the best eye and the patience of a bodhisattva.

    His whole game was like, well, Greg Maddux's changeup. Part of the deal between pitchers and hitters is that you can't control your change quite as well as your fastball. You'll hang some, or let some fly. For kids like me who put a lot of time into learning how to pitch, you just kind of assumed that when you threw a change, you weren't exactly trying to paint corners. Maddux's change was unworldly. Like Thomas, who somehow brought together the skills of a leadoff hitter with the power of a cleanup hitter, Maddux never seemed to have to make any compromises: everything would be sharp, and everything would go where he wanted it to.

    If Thomas and Maddux weren't first-ballot HoFers--if for all they represented they weren't that incredibly distinct from their peers--then MLB would have to change its rules. Drastically. We wouldn't quite recognize the game.

    The voters got it right.
    Last edited by karhu; 01-09-2014 at 07:04 PM.
    That the world is explicable is miraculous, and so explanations need not be the undoing of miracles.

    After you talk about the hole in her nipple, where do you go with it? You’ve got nothing.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwill View Post
    It's not Frank Thomas' fault that Baseball let him play half games. I'm sure he could have put together a HOF career as a below-average first baseman. As things stand, however, he was not a baseball player. He was a hitter.
    Your Cubs have a player in the HoF who once committed 78 errors in a single season. Careful up there on yer horse.
    That the world is explicable is miraculous, and so explanations need not be the undoing of miracles.

    After you talk about the hole in her nipple, where do you go with it? You’ve got nothing.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwill View Post
    he was not a baseball player. He was a hitter.

    This statement is completely laughable. The guy played almost 1,000 games at 1st base with a .990 fielding percentage.

    I guess Mariano Rivera isn't a baseball player either since he only pitched 1 inning every couple of games?

  14. #14
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    I was ecstatic to see he made it in on the first ballot. He was/is my favorite player.

    I saw him at a spring training game in 1993, I think, and I have to say he was the most impressive physical specimen I ever saw in person. He made Bo look little.

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