Page 5 of 238 FirstFirst ... 345671555105 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 3561
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    31,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyped View Post
    This sums it up for me.

    Why is this man not even in jail? I have no tolerance for rent-a-cop types who let the power go to their heads....
    How about cop types who let the power go to their head?

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    17,022
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglesnut View Post
    Unfortunately it's not a risk to their careers. It's an acquired skill in the industry.
    You come to this discussion with an obvious anti-police bias. Not all cops are bad but you seem to paint all of them as terrible people. That's your right but I'm not willing just to jump in and conclude that all of the cops involved in this specific case are wrapped up in a conspiracy to protect some neighborhood watch guy that killed an innocent kid. Show me a common tie or reasonable evidence that they are protecting themselves and Zimmerman and I'd be more than willing to weigh it.
    Occupying the handicap bathroom stall

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Delft, The Netherlands
    Posts
    10,656
    Quote Originally Posted by Marley View Post
    Sure, it's possible. It just seems unlikely that multiple cops would risk careers by trying to intentionally sway eye witness testimony for some neighborhood watch guy. Not like Zimmerman is a brother in blue.
    That assumes that they actually do risk their career by intentionally swaying eye witness testimony. And frankly I seriously doubt that it does (or at least that the odds are that it will), considering how broken the system is - see wrongful conviction rate, and what goes wrong there.

    And FTR, system covering cops is not limited to the US alone (over here a judge threw out a case recently, because the cops clearly made false statements in the documents; the prosecution is now appealing, spinning the blatant falsification as a 'accidental error made because the cops were tired.') Cops are rarely if ever seriously punished for misbehaviour. Indeed, our current Undersecretary of Justice was the leader of a drugs-investigation team run amock, and which had basically turned into a drug-smuggling ring.
    Al Michaels: "That's the loudest manure chant I have ever heared!"

    Sleeping barely above the sea... and walking under water

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    The peanut gallery....
    Posts
    38,347
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglesnut View Post
    How about cop types who let the power go to their head?
    I am tolerant because...ummm..they actually have badges, LOL. Rent-a-cop? Fukkk them....
    "I would not join any club that would have someone like me for a member." - Groucho Marx

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    31,564
    They're all rent a cops. Just at different levels of citizen ****ing powers.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    The peanut gallery....
    Posts
    38,347
    Quote Originally Posted by eaglesnut View Post
    They're all rent a cops. Just at different levels of citizen ****ing powers.
    A rent-a-cop doesn't have a jail to put me in, a lot of back up, helicopters, etc....

    At most, a rent-a-cop has a gun...but probably is advised to never discharge it.
    "I would not join any club that would have someone like me for a member." - Groucho Marx

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,280
    This is the very deffinition of how the system is broken. If im one of the kids family members, i put a round in his face, and claim self defense. After all he killed one innocent man its likely he would do the same to me.
    "Girl was bout as nutty as squirel $h!t"- Uncle ruckas.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    45,623
    Quote Originally Posted by USAFspeedboy View Post
    This is the very deffinition of how the system is broken. If im one of the kids family members, i put a round in his face, and claim self defense. After all he killed one innocent man its likely he would do the same to me.
    Whoa man, don't rush to judgment, wait until all the facts are in! (isn't that what you were saying in the other thread? )
    "the blade itself incites to violence." - Homer

    --

    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs." - Kung fu Monkey

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington
    Posts
    28,558
    Quote Originally Posted by ducky View Post
    This is what happens when you let special interest groups write your laws...in this case the NRA.
    Proof please?

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,280
    Quote Originally Posted by CalgaryHawkFan View Post
    Whoa man, don't rush to judgment, wait until all the facts are in! (isn't that what you were saying in the other thread? )
    R u kidding me? I never said ignore facts, the facts are in, eye witness reports no gun on the kid, no act of violence or instagative act by the victim. I understand you were just looking for a way to somehow invalidate claims that you dont understand, but you picked a subpar way to do it pal.
    "Girl was bout as nutty as squirel $h!t"- Uncle ruckas.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    45,623
    Quote Originally Posted by USAFspeedboy View Post
    R u kidding me? I never said ignore facts, the facts are in, eye witness reports no gun on the kid, no act of violence or instagative act by the victim. I understand you were just looking for a way to somehow invalidate claims that you dont understand, but you picked a subpar way to do it pal.
    <shrug> Just pointing out the inconsistency. Both the police and military are 'total' institutions, and share some of the same issues.
    "the blade itself incites to violence." - Homer

    --

    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs." - Kung fu Monkey

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Grantville, Pa
    Posts
    34,461
    Quote Originally Posted by seahawksfan837 View Post
    Proof please?
    Who else is advocating for universal Stand your Ground laws?
    The consistent factor of all of your dissatisfying relationships and failures is you.

    R.W. 09.21.10 I love you.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Mayor's Income, TN
    Posts
    9,059
    Quote Originally Posted by seahawksfan837 View Post
    Proof please?
    Robert Batey, a criminal law professor at Stetson University College of Law, said Stand Your Ground was spawned when the National Rifle Association experienced some legislative defeats in Congress. "In order to show they had some clout, they started a state-by-state campaign getting states to adopt Stand Your Ground laws."

    http://www2.tbo.com/news/news/2012/f...est-ar-360570/


    The “stand your ground” measures, being pushed by the National Rifle Association (NRA), have been rejected in a handful of states, including gun-friendly Wyoming and Virginia.

    http://www.stateline.org/live/detail...ntentId=107276

    Dubbed "Stand Your Ground" bills by supporters such as the National Rifle Association, the measures generally grant immunity from prosecution and lawsuits to those who use deadly force to combat any unlawful entry or attack. Several states allow people to use deadly force in their homes against intruders; the new measures represent an expansion of self-defense rights to crimes committed in public.

    The NRA and other supporters say the bills are needed in many states that require people under attack in public places to withdraw from the situation, rather than retaliate, unless they can show their lives are in danger. "For someone attacked by criminals to be victimized a second time by a second-guessing legal system is wrong," the NRA's Wayne LaPierre says.

    LaPierre says the NRA is targeting 29 duty-to-retreat states where people can be prosecuted, sued or both if they don't retreat from criminal attacks.

    Florida's law could be facing its first test. Donald Montanez, owner of a Tampa towing company, is charged with murder in the shooting of a man whose car was impounded. Prosecutors say Montanez fired as the man drove off without paying a fee. Montanez's attorney, Roger Rigau, says the new law should protect Montanez, who feared being hit by the driver.


    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...-defense_x.htm
    Scandal is gossip made tedious by morality.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,280
    Quote Originally Posted by CalgaryHawkFan View Post
    <shrug> Just pointing out the inconsistency. Both the police and military are 'total' institutions, and share some of the same issues.
    Not even close brother, cops would crap there pants if they went through real combat stress. Apples n oranges.

    We are in america, not a war torn country, and cops dont have a threat of getting blown up for a living. My uncle who is a vietnam vet and a former crash unit detective in l.a. tells me all the time. Its two seperate animals

    Comparing american cops, to the job troops do at war is like comparing an animal control officer to police.
    "Girl was bout as nutty as squirel $h!t"- Uncle ruckas.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington
    Posts
    28,558
    Quote Originally Posted by PopeyeJones View Post
    Robert Batey, a criminal law professor at Stetson University College of Law, said Stand Your Ground was spawned when the National Rifle Association experienced some legislative defeats in Congress. "In order to show they had some clout, they started a state-by-state campaign getting states to adopt Stand Your Ground laws."

    http://www2.tbo.com/news/news/2012/f...est-ar-360570/


    The “stand your ground” measures, being pushed by the National Rifle Association (NRA), have been rejected in a handful of states, including gun-friendly Wyoming and Virginia.

    http://www.stateline.org/live/detail...ntentId=107276

    Dubbed "Stand Your Ground" bills by supporters such as the National Rifle Association, the measures generally grant immunity from prosecution and lawsuits to those who use deadly force to combat any unlawful entry or attack. Several states allow people to use deadly force in their homes against intruders; the new measures represent an expansion of self-defense rights to crimes committed in public.

    The NRA and other supporters say the bills are needed in many states that require people under attack in public places to withdraw from the situation, rather than retaliate, unless they can show their lives are in danger. "For someone attacked by criminals to be victimized a second time by a second-guessing legal system is wrong," the NRA's Wayne LaPierre says.

    LaPierre says the NRA is targeting 29 duty-to-retreat states where people can be prosecuted, sued or both if they don't retreat from criminal attacks.

    Florida's law could be facing its first test. Donald Montanez, owner of a Tampa towing company, is charged with murder in the shooting of a man whose car was impounded. Prosecutors say Montanez fired as the man drove off without paying a fee. Montanez's attorney, Roger Rigau, says the new law should protect Montanez, who feared being hit by the driver.


    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/...-defense_x.htm
    Ok...that doesn't seem to be the case in this story, as the shooter appears to be the aggressor, no?

    Bad interpretation of the law doesn't mean the intent of the law was bad.

    I think that they need to spend time looking at the word "reasonable" in the law, and realize that this was NOT a case of reasonable suspicion or whatever the terminology was. I actually don't have a problem with the majority of self-defense laws, but I don't see how this falls under it.

Page 5 of 238 FirstFirst ... 345671555105 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  






Part of USA TODAY Sports Digital Properties.