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  1. #1
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    Best kind of firewood?

    I'm a novice when it comes to fireplace wood. I've heard all kinds of advice when it comes to the best type of wood for an indoor fireplace. Some say cherry, others ash, one guy said apple...

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance...

  2. #2
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    Dry


    .......

  3. #3
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFog
    Dry


    .......
    Thanx dude.

    I'll be certain to include that in the order:

    3 chords of dry ________ wood.

  4. #4
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    It probably just depends on what you can get your hands on. My dad (the thrifty dude that he is) usually grabs a bunch of used pallets from his work, cuts them up and burns those.

    I found this, check it out.

  5. #5
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    City boys don't know anything...

    Hardwood is best. Walnut, hickory, hard maples, oak, cherry. You want it to be dry and dense. Avoid soft woods (they burn quickly and make a lot of soot/ash). Avoid pine too. Not only is it soft, the sap makes it crackle and pop.

    If you have a wood burning stove you can heat all night on a couple of hardwood logs.
    Last edited by Dave; 12-02-2006 at 09:17 PM.
    The cake is a lie. I'm pretty sure the numbers in the pie chart are made up too.

  6. #6
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    OK I'm a firewood vet so I'll chime in. Oak is for sure the best wood to burn. Only problem is if it isn't seasoned for at least a year it can be difficult to keep burning. That is why I tend to buy mixed cords.

    A couple of things: A little late in the year to be buying wood. Although everyone will claim their wood is seasoned the fact is they've been selling wood for months now and what they are selling now has no doubt been split recently. This means that you will probably need to split it some more to get it small enough to burn well. DO NOT BUY AN AXE for this job, buy a maul. This looks like an axe but has a much thicker head. Much more weight in the head and makes splitting wood very easy.

    If you must burn pine be careful not to burn too much. It leaves the chimney coated with (spell?) creosole which over time can clog the flew and even lead to chimney fires.
    6 Footers For Bogey Really Suck

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davekn
    OK I'm a firewood vet so I'll chime in. Oak is for sure the best wood to burn. Only problem is if it isn't seasoned for at least a year it can be difficult to keep burning. That is why I tend to buy mixed cords.

    A couple of things: A little late in the year to be buying wood. Although everyone will claim their wood is seasoned the fact is they've been selling wood for months now and what they are selling now has no doubt been split recently. This means that you will probably need to split it some more to get it small enough to burn well. DO NOT BUY AN AXE for this job, buy a maul. This looks like an axe but has a much thicker head. Much more weight in the head and makes splitting wood very easy.

    If you must burn pine be careful not to burn too much. It leaves the chimney coated with (spell?) creosole which over time can clog the flew and even lead to chimney fires.
    The creosole is something we're trying to be proactive on. A friend told me that if you burn a Duralog about every 3rd or 4th fire, it will help eliminate this problem.

    Is apple wood any good? This is apple country, and I can get 3 chords split and delivered for $350.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexPKeaton
    The creosole is something we're trying to be proactive on. A friend told me that if you burn a Duralog about every 3rd or 4th fire, it will help eliminate this problem.

    Is apple wood any good? This is apple country, and I can get 3 chords split and delivered for $350.
    Good lord, anyone got a truck?

    probably cheaper and less risky to just smuggle pot however...

  9. #9
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    Charleston, WV
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexPKeaton
    The creosole is something we're trying to be proactive on. A friend told me that if you burn a Duralog about every 3rd or 4th fire, it will help eliminate this problem.

    Is apple wood any good? This is apple country, and I can get 3 chords split and delivered for $350.
    Apple smells good.

    Are you trying to heat or are you wanting an aesthetic fire to watch, smell, and listen to?

    Hickory and Oak will give you lots of BTU's.

    Apple is going to make an aesthetic fire.

    I burn Oak.

    I try to have about 1/4 to 1/3 of my wood going into the winter left over from last year. I call that my "starter wood". I burn it one or two logs at a time only to get the fire started, then I heap on the newer wood.

    Do you have a gas starter?

    If not, I highly recommend buying some fatwood for kindling, and I use a little squirt of pellet stove jell to get it started. Some jell on 4 -5 pieces of fatwood kindling, a couple of my "starter logs" one match and instant blaze. As soon as the starter logs start to collapse a little bit into the coals, throw on the newer wood. Repeat until all the beer is gone and you have to go to bed.
    Last edited by ChazzMo; 12-02-2006 at 10:04 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexPKeaton
    The creosole is something we're trying to be proactive on. A friend told me that if you burn a Duralog about every 3rd or 4th fire, it will help eliminate this problem.

    Is apple wood any good? This is apple country, and I can get 3 chords split and delivered for $350.
    You shouldn't need the Duralog unless you burn a lot of pine. Apple will burn fine without the problems.

    ***** the purchase of fatwood, pellet stove gell etc. Those are training wheels. No my friend it's time you become a man and learn to light and retain a good fire. Newspaper, kindling, larger sticks about the size of three fingers put together, followed by thin split logs. Once they are burning add larger pieces.

    Unless of course you find that the wood that you bought has been recently split and you're having problems keeping it going. In that case you have my permission to drop some bucks on these artificial means. But just remember, as you gaze into your roaring fire that was made with pellet stove gell think of the best chest you've ever seen. Then realize they are implants.

    ;)
    6 Footers For Bogey Really Suck

  11. #11
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    No gas starter, and purely aesthetic...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davekn
    ***** the purchase of fatwood, pellet stove gell etc. Those are training wheels. No my friend it's time you become a man and learn to light and retain a good fire.
    Real men light fires in a fireplace...

    Up next on wide world of sports... full contact tiddleywinks...

  13. #13
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    Fairfax, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davekn
    You shouldn't need the Duralog unless you burn a lot of pine. Apple will burn fine without the problems.

    ***** the purchase of fatwood, pellet stove gell etc. Those are training wheels. No my friend it's time you become a man and learn to light and retain a good fire. Newspaper, kindling, larger sticks about the size of three fingers put together, followed by thin split logs. Once they are burning add larger pieces.

    Unless of course you find that the wood that you bought has been recently split and you're having problems keeping it going. In that case you have my permission to drop some bucks on these artificial means. But just remember, as you gaze into your roaring fire that was made with pellet stove gell think of the best chest you've ever seen. Then realize they are implants.

    ;)
    My dad used to teach me how to make a good fire. He though it was an art form or something. You two would get along very well. He'd have me out in the woods picking up sticks to keep around for the fire.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasta
    My dad used to teach me how to make a good fire. He though it was an art form or something. You two would get along very well. He'd have me out in the woods picking up sticks to keep around for the fire.
    I took a survival course in grade seven. We had to camp overnight in the middle of winter (build a lean-to out of deadwood). You had two matches, and could bring a sleeping bag...

    you pay more attention when you might be literally freezing your *ss off... :eek:

    birch bark is the best natural igniter going...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFog
    It probably just depends on what you can get your hands on. My dad (the thrifty dude that he is) usually grabs a bunch of used pallets from his work, cuts them up and burns those.

    I found this, check it out.
    That's not a good idea. Most of that pallet wood is treated and has a lot of chemicals in it. Makes pretty colors but not good for inhaling over the long hall. If it is for a bon fire, have at it, but I wouldn't use it indoors.

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